ye olde bread blogge

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Bread with 60% of very coarse rye meal

with 10 comments

The message of this post: When adding coarsely ground grains to a bread dough, add a lot.

Inclusion of about only 10% of it makes no sense imo, it barely has any positive effect other than yielding a speckled crumb. But it’s important to soak the meal before adding it to the final dough, either with or without sourdough starter, i.e. plain soaker or sourdough-meal build.

Recipe: Kleiner Schrotling (1 small loaf)

Soaker

  • 50g linseeds (flaxseeds)
  • 100g coarse rye meal, e.g. chopped rye or ‘pumpernickel flour’
  • 250g very warm water

Mix and let stand covered for at least 5 hours.

Sourdough

  • 140g coarse rye meal, e.g. chopped rye or ‘pumpernickel flour’
  • 180g water
  • 10g mature rye sourdough culture

Mix and let stand at room temperature for 18-24 hours.

Dough

  • 160g whole-wheat flour
  • Enough handwarm water to make a moderately loose dough
  • 8g salt
  • 4g fresh yeast
  • Soaker
  • Sourdough

Mix dough on slow speed for about 5 minutes. By hand, use a fork to mix shortly every minute for 5 minutes. Let rest for about an hour. Mix again on slow speed for 5 minutes. Meal doughs need a longer mixing time because a coarse grind soaks up the water slowly.

Put into greasad small loaf tin and let stand for 45 minutes.

Bake at 230°C for 20 minutes, reduce heat to 190°C and bake for further 40 minutes.

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Written by theinversecook

12 August 2009 at 15:40

Posted in Bao, Bread, Brot, food, pain, pane, Recipe

10 Responses

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  1. I’m going to take the sourdough out of my fridge now, so that I can bake this fantastic bread!

    mihl

    24 August 2009 at 11:36

    • Good luck with it, miehl. Thanks for trying the recipe.

      theinversecook

      24 August 2009 at 23:32

  2. I made this the other day and it came out wonderfully! It is so moist and delicious! I didn’t have whole flax seeds on hand but a brand new package of grünkern, so I used 150 g grünkern meal for the soaker. Very delicious. Because this bread is so moist it is very good for freezing as well. Again, thanks for the recipe. P.S. I’m going to blog about this soon.

    mihl

    27 August 2009 at 13:46

    • Glad to hear it, mihl. I just made a similar loaf with fine rye meal but poured hot water over it before mixing with the sourdough starter. The crumb came out almost too soft and moist. Strange. So I will go back to using this recipe…

      theinversecook

      28 August 2009 at 20:51

  3. [...] olde bread blogge. The author is a fellow German and his recipes are always fantastic. I tried his 60% rye bread with several substitutions. For the soaker I used 150 g unripe smoked spelt kernels (Grünkern), [...]

  4. I’m a big fan of rye bread, but I use ordinary superkarket rye flour – which is not that dark. Who produces or where (in UK) can I obtain coarse rye flour (pumpernickel flour)?

    Michael

    13 November 2009 at 01:51

    • Coarse rye flour should be fine, although the resulting bread might be (strangely) closer-textured. I do find that a medium coarseness works best in most cases. A very fine grind seems to have a tightening effect on the crumb in this bread.

      theinversecook

      27 November 2009 at 17:56

  5. Michael you can get chopped rye from Shipton Mill and they do two sorts of rye flour, a light and a dark. There may be other traditional millers who do it but I haven’t found them yet. So Shipton is probably your best bet unless you have a friend going to Germany with a car…..

    Zeb

    19 November 2009 at 21:58

    • We should build a UK-GER baking bridge and send good stuff to each other. If only the parcels didn’t take so long (and flours weren’t so heavy)…

      theinversecook

      27 November 2009 at 18:01

  6. [...] olde bread blogge. The author is a fellow German and his recipes are always fantastic. I tried his 60% rye bread with several substitutions. For the soaker I used 150 g unripe smoked spelt kernels (Grünkern), [...]


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