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Oregano-Crusted Potato-Bread

with 5 comments

Note: This recipe is also available as separate pdf-file with picture: Oregano-Crusted Potato-Bread


Using dried oregano as a topping makes this bread a little heartier with a nod towards Mediterranean cooking. If you prefer a more pronunced spicy flavor and a cleaner loaf (the oregano will eventually fall off the crust), just add the dried spices to the dough. Or use other herbs, like thyme or – one of my favorites – black onion seeds aka ‘Nigella’. This bread is good to have with tomato soup.

Oregano-Crusted Potato-Bread

  • 160g strong white flour
  • 40g whole-wheat flour
  • 40g levain, hydration: 100%
  • 40g grated raw potato
  • 120g water
  • 2g fresh yeast
  • 4g sea salt
  • Dried oregano

Bulk Fermentation: 1 hour. Press the shaped dough into damp towels, then roll in a little oregano.
Final Fermentation: 1-1.5 hours
Bake-off: Bake at 230°C for 20-25 minutes to a healthy brown color.

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Written by theinversecook

17 November 2007 at 17:53

5 Responses

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  1. Wonderful! I’ve never used grated raw potato in a dough. It looks very easy and tasty.

    Susan

    17 November 2007 at 20:26

  2. Ich finde schon gekochte Kartoffeln schwierig zu verarbeiten :-). Welche Kartoffelsorte hast du genommen?

    Ulrike

    18 November 2007 at 12:49

  3. @Susan: I have used it before, but am not exactly sure what potatoes do to a bread dough. I think the crust is a bit more robust, apart from the potato flavor in the bread. I would have thought the bread stayed moist longer with potatoes in it, but that was not the case. Hm, maybe use cooked or roasted ones next time…?

    @Ulrike: Die Sorte weiß ich leider nicht mehr. War so eine eigroße dunkelhäutige mit sehr viel Schmutz dran :-) Gekochte Kartoffeln finde ich besonders schwierig zu verarbeiten, besonders in großer Menge, weil es so lange braucht, bis sich Mehl und Kartoffel verbunden haben.

    theinversecook

    18 November 2007 at 16:42

  4. Na, du wirst doch wissen, ob sie eher zu den mehligen oder zu den festkochenden eigroßen dunkelhäutigen Dingern (mit und ohne Schmutz dran) zählen würde. :-)

    Ulrike

    19 November 2007 at 11:06

  5. Ich glaube, es sind festkochende Kartoffeln. Ein Gnocchiteig, den ich damit fertigte, war ausgesprochen weich und klebrig (also nicht so gut).

    theinversecook

    19 November 2007 at 14:18


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